Cynthia Levinson

Award-winning author Cynthia Levinson writes nonfiction books for elementary and middle-grade readers that focus on social justice.

She also speaks frequently at national teacher conventions and Society of Childrens Book Writers & Illustrators conferences on a range of topics, including research techniques, diversity in children’s literature, and narrative arc.

Previously, Cynthia taught graduate-level teacher preparation courses and worked with six state education agencies on strategic planning, curriculum, and technology.

She loves involving students in her school presentations through acting, music, games, and exercises.

Books

The Youngest Marcher: The True Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, A Young Civil Rights Activist (Atheneum/Simon and Schuster, 2017)

Kirkus Reviews said the book is “A vivid reminder that it took a community to fight segregation and the community responded.”

Hillary Rodham Clinton: Do All the Good You Can (Balzer and Bray/HarperCollins, 2016)

Horn Book said the book is “well organized, engaging, and voluminously sourced.”

Watch Out for Flying Kids: How Two Circuses, Two Countries, and Nine Kids Confront Justice and Build Community (Peachtree Publishers, 2015)

Kirkus Reviews called the book  “…a thoroughly enjoyable volume. Enchanting indeed—and inspiring as well.”

International Literacy Association: 2016 Social Justice Literature Award for Nonfiction

Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Readers

Booklist Top Ten Multicultural Nonfiction Book for Youth

We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March (Peachtree Publishers, 2012)

Four starred reviews, including Student Library Journal: “This photo-essay stands out for its engrossing content, excellent composition, and riveting use of primary-source material.”

Honored by numerous awards and placed on lists, including: SCBWI Golden Kite Award for Nonfiction (Honor Book), NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children (Honor Book), YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults (Finalist), American Library Association: Notable Children’s Book, VOYA Nonfiction Honor List, Parents’ Choice: Gold Medal, Society of School Librarians International (Honor Book for Social Studies K-6; Best Book for Social Studies 7-12), Junior Library Guild Selection, Spirit of Texas Reading Program–Middle School, American Booksellers Association’s New Voices, and many more.

Author Visit Presentations

YOU’RE NEVER TOO LITTLE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

When Audrey Faye Hendricks was nine years old, she stood up to segregation and said, “That’s not right!” She was determined to make a difference. Your students can make a difference, too. Cynthia takes children along Audrey’s journey as they talk about issues they want to fix, create signs, write new words to a moving song, and then step up to change their world.

THE HERO’S JOURNEY: IT’S NOT JUST FOR FICTION

Using a map of the mythic “Hero’s Journey,” students in Grades 3-8 learn about narrative arc while following the route of real heroic children.

WRITING TRUTH THAT READS LIKE FICTION

The factors that make fiction seem real–characterization, plot, setting, story arc–bring nonfiction to life for Grades 3-8.

FERGUSON MEETS THE WEST BANK–AND THEY JUGGLE!

The geography in the title isn’t exact but the story is true. In this session for Grades 4-8, students learn how kids from the Midwest and the Middle East leap over social boundaries by focusing on their similarities rather than their differences. And we play circus games!

Presentations and Workshops for Writers

THE HERO’S JOURNEY: IT’S NOT JUST FOR FICTION

Use a map of the mythic “Hero’s Journey” to structure nonfiction along a classic narrative arc.

WRITING TRUTH THAT READS LIKE FICTION

The factors that make fiction seem real–characterization, plot, setting, story arc–bring nonfiction to life, too.

Presentations and Workshops for Teachers

RELUCTANT READER: MEET RELUCTANT HERO

Whole books, especially nonfiction, can be daunting to reluctant readers. Using graphic organizers, you can follow the thread of one person, a real-life “bad boy” who becomes a hero, to entice students–and still get the big picture.

THE HERO’S JOURNEY: IT’S NOT JUST FOR FICTION

Use a map of the mythic “Hero’s Journey” to follow the route of real heroic children. This is English Language Arts and Social Studies rolled into one.

Website

Availability and Honorariums

Contact for Samantha Clark at bookings@thebookingbiz.com for rates and availability

Videos